Home

One LOVELY Blog award (thanks to the Frog)

16 Comments

Yes I’ve been kissed by the frog and I feel like Cinderella.

Shucks I’m new here, but it’s been an absolute joy to meet all the friendly folks who are ueber supportive in the Whole Blog World.

First of all, thank you very, very, very much to the Greedy Frog for nominating me. I have such delight when I get the ping that her new zesty, fun and eye-candy blog rich in adjectives and calories gets a post, I dive to the desktop to read,  for the iPhone format cannot do it justice. Check out the food from this French expat living in the north of England.

Now for the rules:

1. Thank the person who nominated you.
 (check!) 2. Add The One Lovely Blog Award to your post. (uh, check!) 
3. Share 7 things about yourself.
 4. Pass the award on to 15 nominees.
5. Include this set of rules.
6. Inform your nominees by posting a comment on their blogs

7 things about me:

  1. I am double-jointed in the right foot, right hand and right shoulder.
  2. Worst job: gift wrapper at Macy’s Christmas
  3. I have kissed the Blarney Stone
  4. Before kids I wanted to learn to skydive and bungee jump – course that changed first with our marriage, then on Feb. 27, 1997 and again August 24, 1999. Kids need a mom, after all.
  5. I have had more hair styles than Katie Couric.
  6. It’s impossible for me to live without reading and music.
  7. I am intolerant of intolerance. And yes, I see the irony. I’m working on it people.

And my nominees are…

1. Progressive Papa: Vic has opinions on a lot of things (from Mitt to Obama), and some solutions as well. I love this blog because you just never know what the next topic will be.

2. Amazing Azaleas: She is a young fashionista with a keen photographic eye. I adore this!

3. The Belle Jar: Insightful observations pro-female writings to make you think and the writing! It’s never wrong to channel Sylvia Plath.

4. Stuff Worth Talking About: Great insights into advertising, promotion and economics. Doug tells it like it is.

5. For Your Good Health: A blog about real world gardening, health and taking control of your future.

6. View and Mews by Coffee Kat: Kate makes me laugh and think with her reminisces about the world of HR

7. The South In My Mouth: Catherine has a twist on southern food that is absolutely the bomb. Best latest recipe I made from her – spicy twisted bacon. Mmmm.

8. Thoughts of a Lunatic: Secrets out, loony girl, your blog is my guilty pleasure for making me laugh out loud. If I were you reader, I’d follow her too!

9. A Day in the Life of Patootie: Self disclosure, I am an ancestry geek. This is why I’m an avid follower of Sharron.

10. The Smile Scavenger: She’s on the quest for happiness and I’m on her side.

11. Ramblings of a Cluttered Mind: She crafty. She makes things. She just not pretentious about it.

12. 1500 Saturdays: This English gal is not standing still. She’s making every second count.

13. The Attic Room: A writer of non-fiction. Making every stroke count.

14. One Odd Duck: Different. In a Good Way. Try it the Duck Way.

15. Damoward: Visual, technically stimulating. Me likey.

Truly there are plenty more blogs to include. I adore the creativity of blogging!

Advertisements

Hunger is Not a Game

23 Comments

Connecting the dots.

Drawing the lines between what I read, what I believe, what I’ve learned and what I do. That’s been part of the fun and challenge of my reading goal for this year.

What I do is work for a food bank. I believe that no person should go hungry. I’ve learned that hunger is in unexpected places.

  • 1 in 4 children in Nevada do not know where their next meal is coming from
  • The Food Bank helps more than 97,000 people per month
  • The Food  Bank serves the hungry through 130+ partner agencies
  • The Food Bank and partners offer free meals to 28 sites in Washoe County during summer
  • The Food Bank of Northern Nevada distributed 10.5 million pounds of food last year.

But SOMETIMES statistics can’t tell the whole story of hunger.

Children care about hunger issues

A recent invitation to stage a food drive at a Sparks, NV elementary school during a special spring event revealed so much more.

This school is “over” standards that would make children eligible for government programs to address hunger and yet, and yet…as the young students and families brought contributions to the food drive, stories emerged.

“I was wondering about the food bank truck I see at Sparks Christian Fellowship,” asked a dad who had just donated a large bag of food to the barrel.

“Oh, it’s a pantry site and they sure could use some volunteers,” replied the Food Bank employee on site. But that’s wasn’t his question. He went on to explain that he and his family belong to a group of seasonally employed — those in the construction trades who don’t always have work in the winter months and need help with food. Because of the food drive, he now has some additional information on how to access food when his family needs it.

A sweet, blonde second-grade boy cruised by a couple times with his book bag slung over his shoulder, blue eyes seeking out a friend or two.

Later, a middle-aged woman with two children at the school donated another large bag of food and our employee thanks her for her donation, “You are welcome, she said, “I always give when I see a barrel. You see, I’ve stood in line for food from you. I know what it feels like and I want to give back. I’m all right now.”

This was turning into a very surprising food drive.

The night was pleasant as children dashed back and forth to classrooms playing games and earning raffle tickets for good reading habits. Among them was the second-grade boy, who shied away from the wave from our employee.

Whereupon a mother passed and commented, Food Bank, ahhh, I’ve always wondered — how can I volunteer?”

“How nice!” our Food Bank representative said, noting that she spoke with a Spanish accent. “We can certainly use bilingual help, if that would fit with you. We can use help with our Mobile Pantry program.” The outgoing mom took with her information on places she can help out with her skills.

Gosh, who knew that we would be collecting more than food? Always great to garner a volunteer.

Soon the children gathered in the multipurpose room for lemonade and books and a chance at the raffle, but our employee stayed outside with the food barrel, just in case.

The nicely dressed blonde boy — sporting a yellow lei that the school provided for the tropical theme — overcame his shyness momentarily and asked, “How much does this food cost?”

“Oh, sweetie, I”m not selling it. I’m collecting food.”

“But how much does it cost?” he persisted.

“If you don’t have any food to give tonight, that’s OK. There’ll be other times — other food drives,” our employee explained.

“But,” he said, gesturing to a pocket.

“No, no. I’m not selling the food. We give it away to people who are hungry.”

One look from him revealed the truth.

“Are you hungry right now buddy?”

“Yes.”

“No food at home?”

No.”

“Well, let’s get you some food right now,” she said in a quiet voice.” “I see you’ve got a bag with you now, can we slip some in there?”

Blondie’s head bobbed up and down, a smile creeping to his lips. “But I got a baby sister, and a mom…”

“Well, let’s pick out some food for them too — want to?”

Increased nodding of head. He stood on tip-toe looking into the Food Bank barrel. He picked out some turkey chili beans for himself, some soup for his mom. “But my sister, she’s just 18-months old. She can’t eat just anything,” came his words, almost in panic.

“OK, you and I are going to dig in here until we find something.”

At last they found some apple sauce, and he slipped this last can into his bag. “Oh, my mom is going to be SO happy!” he said.

The tears that had been gathering in my eyes began to leak out; I didn’t want him to see.

“You are a good boy,” I said. “And a good big brother.”

Off he scampered, eager to walk home and share this food.

He is the one in four who doesn’t know where his next meal is coming from — but he’s plainly not a statistic. He’s a little boy. A neighbor. A student. A friend. A Nevadan. A person.

This school now has information on our summer food program where children aged 1 to 18 can access food in area parks. It is a middle class school, but you see, pockets of hunger are everywhere, and the faces of hunger can surprise and enlighten. Even us.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

This, ladies and gentlemen, was a heart-wrenching experience for me. I carry that little boy with me every day to the food bank and from the food bank.  He reminds me that I can make a difference and that I am making a difference.

Chances are, wherever you live, there is a Food Bank. If you can, volunteer, or give a can of food to help.

As for reading, I do recommend “Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America” by Ehrenreich, Barbara.